Supporting Student Writing Inside and Outside the Classroom

Low Stakes Writing Activities and Giving Effective Feedback

This resource is designed for teaching assistants who want to better support their students with their written work. We’ve organized this resource into two parts: examples of low-stakes writing activities TAs can use in their tutorials and strategies for giving effective feedback on written work. A two-pronged approach to supporting student writing considers what we can do inside and outside of the classroom. The approaches we’ve chosen to feedback and low-stakes writing reflect teaching best practices but also are attentive to the specific contexts of teaching at the University of Toronto — specifically keeping in mind that our students are often Multi-Language Learners (MLL) and that as TAs, we have constraints on our time and little autonomy to change a course design.

This resource is designed for teaching assistants who want to better support their students with their written work. We’ve organized this resource into two parts: examples of low-stakes writing activities TAs can use in their tutorials and strategies for giving effective feedback on written work. A two-pronged approach to supporting student writing considers what we can do inside and outside of the classroom. The approaches we’ve chosen to feedback and low-stakes writing reflect teaching best practices but also are attentive to the specific contexts of teaching at the University of Toronto — specifically keeping in mind that our students are often Multi-Language Learners (MLL) and that as TAs, we have constraints on our time and little autonomy to change a course design.

PART ONE: Low-Stakes Writing Activities

PART TWO: Giving Feedback on Written Work

BIBLIOGRAPHY

This mini-guide draws on scholarly work carried out by Cristina D’Amico and Abdullah Farooqi, TATP Humanities Trainers at the Teaching Assistants’ Training Program, Centre for Teaching Support & Innovation, University of Toronto.