Teaching Assistants' Training Program

Centre for Teaching Support & Innovation, 130 St. George Street, Robarts Library, 4th floor

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Teaching as Performance: Strategies for Self-Confidence and Self-care

Thursday, July 7, 2016 @ 10:00 am - 12:00 pm

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Details

Date:
Thursday, July 7, 2016
Time:
10:00 am - 12:00 pm
Event Categories:
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Description

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Blackburn Room, Robarts Library 4th Floor – CORE

Alli Diskin, Program Assistant, CTSI/TATP
Mariana Jardim, Faculty Liaison, Teaching, Learning and Technology

As teachers, we are like performers held to the highest standards, and often asked to execute the most dangerous and thrilling feats. We memorize, we improvise, we speak for long hours (often without break), and the deep connections we are asked to cultivate and strengthen with our audience (that is, our students) over an extended period require effort, patience, and stamina. Such expectations can provoke feelings of fear and even disorder. Stage fright, impostor syndrome—new teachers often speak of these issues, and yet rarely do workshops address the tools that can be learned and practiced to manage and overcome such anxieties. A substantial amount of current literature offers that public speaking training for instructors can improve teaching, foster student topic retention, and support higher learning standards (Andrews, 2006; Felder & Brent, 1999)

This workshop draws on recent scholarship about the value of public speaker training for higher education instructors. By the end of this workshop, participants will be equipped with strategies and tools that they can use to…
• Channel nervousness into positive energy
• Develop a confident and ‘at ease’ presence in the classroom
• Sustain clear, expressive and resonant vocal production through supported breath
• Understand how body language informs the internal and external environment

References:
Andrews, P. H. (2006). Improving lecturing skills: Some insights from speech communication. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.
Felder, R. M., & Brent, R. (1999). FAQS. II: Active learning vs. covering the syllabus and dealing with large classes. Chemical Engineering Education, 33, 276–277.